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Blue - The Colour Of Khalsa Faujan
Posted by: ਖਾਲਸਾ (IP Logged)
Date: July 22, 2009 07:16AM

On this forum we have read accounts of Gursikhs like Bhai Manee Singh Jee, Baba Gurbaksh Singh Jee, Baba Deep Singh Jee, Bhai Daya Singh Jee, the Tath Khalsa, Shaheedeean Misl, Shaheed Singhs and even Guru Gobind Singh Jee wearing the Blue Bana. There are further accounts of other GurSikhs wearing blue including the Sahibzadas.

Some have tried to explain the description of wearing of Blue from historical sources and in turn have tried to undermine its significant in the Khalsa’s form but they have failed to be convincing. It must be more than just a coincidence for so many old historical accounts to state the colour blue.

Although there have been occasions were Kesree and white have been mentioned but these however have not been as extensively as Blue. Kesree has been mentioned as the colour worn by some GurSikhs on their Shaheedee. White and Kesree have been worn on certain sevas but blue has been the colour worn generally.

Colour it self does not mean much on its own but when it becomes the colour of the uniform worn by a body then it has a value. Any army has a uniform and this uniform is the same through out, that’s why it’s called a uniform. A uniform gives the appearance of discipline, identity, equality and unity amongst its wearers. In a battle a uniform produces these effects on its enemies many fold.

Guru Gobind Singh Jee when introducing the khalsa in 1699 produced the Panj Payare in Blue for the world to see.
Below are some more quotes from old historical documents describing the wearing of Blue by the Khasla :


ਕੱਛ ਸ਼ਸਤਰ ਬੰਧਵਾਇ ਸਿੰਘ ਨਾਮ ਧਰਨੇ ਮਹਾਂ ਕਾਲ ਦਾ ਬਾਣਾ ਨੀਲਾ ਪਹਿਰਾਵਣਾ I ( Bansavalee Naama )



ਸੀਸ ਕੇਸ ਨੀਲਅੰਬਰੀ ਸਿੰਘ ਸੰਗਿਆ ਤੇਜ ਨਿਵਾਸ I ( Mehma Prakash )



ਜਗੇ ਸਿੰਘ ਜੋਧੇ ਧਰੇ ਨੀਲ ਭੇਸਾ I ( Ugradhanthee )



ਯੋਂ ਉਪਜੇ ਸਿੰਘ ਭੁਜੰਗੀਏ ਨੀਲੰਬਰ ਧਾਰਾ । ( Bhai Gurdas Singh Jee )

 



Re: Blue - The Colour Of Khalsa Faujan
Posted by: NiranjanSingh (IP Logged)
Date: July 22, 2009 10:43AM

Thank you for the references, ਖਾਲਸਾ jee.

Here is an eyewitness account of the 1699 Vaiskahi smagam in which it is stated theat the Panch wore blue, including Guru Sahib Ji:


(ਭੱਟ ਵਹੀ ਪਰਗਣਾ ਥਾਨੇਸਰ)

ਸ੍ਰੀ ਗੁਰੂ ਗੋਬਿੰਦ ਸਿੰਘ ਜੀ ਮਹਲ ਦਸਮਾਂ...ਬੇਟਾ ਗੁਰੂ ਤੇਗ ਬਹਾਦਰ ਜੀ ਕਾ,
ਸਾਲ ਸਤ੍ਰਾਂ ਸੈ ਪਚਾਵਨ ਮੰਗਲਵਾਰ ਵੈਸਾਖੀ ਕੇ ਦਿਹੁੰ ਪਾਂਚ ਸਿਖੋਂ ਕੋ ਖਾਂਡੇ ਕੀ ਪਾਹੁਲ ਦੀ, ਸਿੰਘ ਨਾਮ ਰਾਖਾ।.....

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
...ਸਭ ਕੋ ਨੀਲੰਬਰ ਪਹਿਨਾਇਆ, ਵਹੀ ਵੇਸ ਅਪਨਾ ਕੀਆ।
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

...ਕੰਘਾ ਕਰਦ ਕੇਸਗੀ ਕੜਾ ਕਛਿਹਰਾ ਸਭ ਕੋ ਦੀਆ...

 



Re: Blue - The Colour Of Khalsa Faujan
Posted by: mpsingh86 (IP Logged)
Date: August 04, 2009 12:23AM

1.When Guru Gobind Singh Ji baptized the five beloveds they came out from the tents wearing a blue attire.

2.There is one saying which laid the foundation that every Nihang will have to wear blue clothes.

3.Another saying goes like this; One day Sahibzada Fateh Singh ji came in front of Guru Gobind Singh Ji wearing blue ‘Dumalla’, on seeing this guru announced that people who will wear this dress will form a ‘Panth’

4.Another Saakhi goes like this; when guru ji removed the cloak of ‘Uch De Peer’ he tied a part of it to his ‘Kartar’. That was the origin of blue attire community

5.When Mata Gujri saw her grandson in the blue uniform she said your great grand father the sixth Guru used to dress up in a same way. When they all came in front of Guru Gobind Singh Ji, he said that this is the most sacred wearing and reflects a true Khalsa. Later he (Guru) declared that every true Khalsa will have this appearance which reflects "Akal Purkh de Fauj". This place where guru founded the Khalsa panth was known as ‘Damal Gargh’.

6.Hemkunt Sahib: Kamarkasa Compulsory: It is also compulsory to wear the Kamarkasa for every individual who is on pilgrimage to HEMKUNT SAHIB. In fact Nihang Sikhs still wear the Kamarkasa till today.


“The Blue Colur signifies the believe in Peace and Non-Violence. The Chakuta (head dress)signifies a Child asking forgiveness from his Father, the Almighty Lord"

 



Re: Blue - The Colour Of Khalsa Faujan
Posted by: 13khalsa (IP Logged)
Date: August 28, 2009 07:40AM

The following was posted on this website a while ago in response to claims that Blue was not the colour of the Khalsa.

************************


I applaud Amritpal Singh for his analysis of Snatani practices. But as they say, we shouldn’t throw the baby out with the bath water. I was concerned to see him try to dismiss Blue as a Khalsa colour.

Blue has traditionally been worn by the Khalsa along with orange and white. Black is also acceptable but became popular later on.

I will try to give a preliminary reply to his article here



Muslims & Blue


I and some other Singhs were discussing Amrit’s article on blue clothes and one Singh asked why “neel bastar” were described as being Muslim colours and why the Khalsa now wears neela.

Muslims are not discerned by blue clothes now. In the past Muslim dress has always been thought to have been green (haideri) and Muslim Ghazis are known to wear Green clothing. Why does Gurbani say blue?

A Singh from Kashmir (Poonch) was sitting with us and he said that where he is from, the locals call green “neela”. They call green chilis not “haree mirch” but “neelee mirch” they call green grass “neela ghaa”.

This explains it. For people of that area, neela meant not blue, but green.



What Did Guru Gobind Singh Wear?


There has been an attempt to say that Guru Gobind Singh jee only wore blue when leaving the forest in Macchiwara.

The oldest account of Guru Gobind Singh jee and the formation of the Khalsa is the Bhatt Vehis. What do the Bhatt Vehis say about what Guru Sahib wore when the Khalsa was created?

The Bhatt Vehi "Multani Sindhi Pargana Thanaysar" is described by Piara Singh Padam as the oldest account of this event :

>>>>>>>>>>>
"Sri Guru Gobind Singh Ji, tenth Guru, son of Guru Tegh Bahadur Ji, in the year 1752 on Tuesday-the Vaisakhi day-gave Khande ki pahul to five Sikhs and surnamed them as Singhs. First Daya Ram Sopti, Khatri resident of Lahore stood up. Then Mohkam Chand Calico printer of Dawarka; Sahib Chand barber of Zafrabad city; Dharam Chand Jawanda Jat of Hastinapur; Himmat Chand water carrier of Jagannath stood up one after the other. All were dressed in blue and he himself also dressed the same way. Hookah, halaal, hajaamat, haraam, tikka, janeu, dhoti were prohibited. Socialisation with the descendants of Prithi Chand, followers of Dhirmal and Ram Rai, clean shaven people and Masands was prohibited. All were given Kangha, Karad, Kesgee, Karhaa, and Kacheraa. All were made Keshdhaaree. Everyone’s place of birth was told to be Patna, of residence as Anandpur. Rest, Guru’s deeds are known only to the Guru. Repeat Guru Guru, the Guru will help everywhere
>>>>>>>>>>

So blue was the colour the Khalsa was first given according to the oldest source.



Amritpal Singh has said

>>>>>>>>

Furthermore, when Guru Gobind Singh Ji left for his heavenly abode, he was also in saffron ('Kesree') attire. 'Gur Bilaas Paatshaahee 10' written by Bhai Kuyer Singh clearly mentions the colour of Guru Ji's clothing, when he left for the 'Sachkhand': -
Aap Snaan Karyo Sah Kesan, Kesree Khyom Patam Pahraaye.
From the foregoing analysis of various texts, we can conclude that Guru Gobind Singh Ji wore clothing of various colours and that to assert that he wore only blue attire after the inauguration of the Khalsa in 1699 is wholly incorrect.
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
No one denies that kesri is an acceptable colour. Punj Pyaaray today generally are all dressed in kesri robes. Kesri is considered a royal colour. The fact that Guru Gobind Singh jee was wearing kesri only says that kesri is an acceptable colour for the Sikhs as well, not that blue is not special or unacceptable (as the article seems to suggest).
What would surprise me would be if Amritpal Singh could show me any reference to Dashmesh Pita jee wearing something besides Blue, White, Kesri or Black. That would be a find.
Clearly, Blue was a special and acceptable colour of the Khalsa. Guru Gobind Singh jee being royalty, wore kesri as well (as our royal Punj Pyaaray still do today). This is not a surprise, but to be expected.


Puraatan Sikhs and Colours

Amritpal Singh has provided the quotation about the dress of the sahibzadas:
>>>>>>>
the Sahibzadas were in fact in saffron (Kesaree) clothing: -
Kesaree Ang Paushaak Mahaabar, Moorat Pekh Kahai Eh Baanee.
>>>>>>>
As I said before, Kesree is the royal colour for the Sikhs. It is no shock that the princely Sahibzadas would have worn this colour.


What I do take issue with is Amrit’s next statement:
>>>>>>>>>>
Bhai Sukha Singh speaks of Sahibzada Ajit Singh Ji, the eldest son of Guru Gobind Singh Ji being called into the holy court of Guru Gobind Singh Ji. He comes to Guru Ji and Bhai Sukha Singh describes his attire as consisting of red ('Arun') shoes which were shining on Sahibzada Ajit Singh Ji's feet, a red shawl, a red shirt and a red turban which graceful upon his head. The original lines read as follows: -
>>>>>>>>>
The colour red has been forbidden amongst the Sikhs since the start. It is not an acceptable colour for Sikhs to wear.
Bhai Daya Singh rehitnama tells us that those “who use colour prepared from red ochre or the kusumbha flower” are tankhaiyas. It says plainly, “Bastr kusunbhay na pehray” or “Do not wear clothing which is coloured red. ”(verse 23).
Bhai Prehlad Singh Hukumnama also tells us, “soohay anbar pehn kar jo naasay nasvar…” “He who wears red clothing, or inhales nasavar up his nose will be beaten about the head and thrown into hell” (verse 12).
So how is it that this description of Baba Ajeet Singh jee came about? Some questions must be asked:
Who was Sukha Singh? The fact is that he NEVER SAW Sahibzada Baba Ajeet Singh jee. On what basis is he giving such a detailed description besides his own imagination? Sukha Singh was born in 1768 and wrote this in 1797. After a hundred years, how would he know what Baba jee was wearing? This is clearly his own literary imagination at work, not a statement of fact.


Amrit has also given a description of Baba Gurbaksh Singh and the Singhs with him who became Shaheeds. He quotes Pracheen Panth Prakash as following:
>>>>>>>>>
Giani Gian Singh writes in 'Panth Prakash' that Bhai Gurbaksh Singh wore saffron clothing, when he went to fight: -
Tan Dhare Bastar Kesree, Dastaar Ooch Sajaaye.
(He wore saffron robes and tied a high turban).
In 'Pracheen Panth Parkash', Ratan Singh Bhangu speaks of the colours worn by other Sikh companions of Bhai Gurbaksh Singh Ji:
Kisai Pushaak Thee Neelee Sajaayee.
Kinai Set, Kisai Kesaree Rangvaayee.
>>>>>>>>>
This is no big finding. It goes with what has always been known. White, Orange and Blue are all Khalsa colours. It doesn’t say here that they wore green or red. Only Orange, Blue and White. This is in complete accordance with Khalsa Tradition.
I’m not much moved by the descriptions of Singhs in only kacherras and blankets. Singhs in those times had very little. Depending on the condition of the weather and their own economic condition, it is possible they wore very little. But that does not go to say that Sikh dress is no dress at all. Clearly this dress was functional for the circumstances. Even today some bana-wearing Singhs will wear only a fatoohee (short kurta) when they are training for gatka or some other circumstance, but that doesn’t mean this alone in isolation is the dress.


Proof of Special Nature of Blue Dress

Blue dress is not something recently invented for the Khalsa. As mentioned before, Bhatt VEhis tell us that Guru Sahib himself dressed the Khalsa in Blue.
Furthermore, the vaar “Vah Vah Gobind Singh Aapay Gur Chela” we all sing, tells us about the creation of the Khalsa as well.

ਨਿਜ ਪੰਥ ਚਲਾਇਓ ਖਾਲਸਾ ਧਰਿ ਤੇਜ ਕਰਾਰਾ॥

ਸਿਰ ਕੇਸ ਧਾਰਿ ਗਹਿ ਖੜਗ ਕੋ ਸਭ ਦੁਸਟ ਪਛਾਰਾ॥

ਸੀਲ ਜਤ ਕੀ ਕਛ ਪਹਰਿ ਪਕੜੋ ਹਥਿਆਰਾ॥

ਸਚ ਫਤੇ ਬੁਲਾਈ ਗੁਰੂ ਕੀ ਜੀਤਿਓ ਰਣ ਭਾਰਾ॥

ਸਭ ਦੈਤ ਅਰਿਨਿ ਕੋ ਘੇਰ ਕਰਿ ਕੀਚੈ ਪ੍ਰਹਾਰਾ॥

ਤਬ ਸਹਿਜੇ ਪ੍ਰਗਟਿਓ ਜਗਤ ਮੈ ਗੁਰੁ ਜਾਪ ਅਪਾਰਾ॥

ਇਉਂ ਉਪਜੇ ਸਿੰਘ ਭੁਜੰਗੀਏ ਨੀਲ ਅੰਬਰ ਧਾਰਾ॥

See the last line. It says that “thus the Bhujangi Singhs were created, dressed in blue”.
The puritan Rehitnamas also tell us that Blue is a Khalsa colour. Bhai Daya Singh’s rehtinama tells us that a Khalsa colour is “surmaiee” or dark blue (verse 23). He goes on further to say , “So Akali rooop hai neel bastar dherai” or “An Akali is known by the blue garments he wears”. Clearly blue clothing was a special Khalsa colour!

Rattan Singh Bhangu in Pracheen Panth Parkash writes about the differences that lead to the split between Baba Banda Singh and the Tat-Khalsa. In regards to the clothing issue, he writes that Baba Banda Singh wanted his soldiers to wear red, which was unacceptable to the traditionally blue wearing Khalsa:

“ ਨੀਲ ਪਹਿਰਨ ਤੇ ਦੂਰ ਕਰਾਯੋ॥ ਸਮਰਾ ਸੂਹਾ ਸੀਸ ਬੰਧਾਯੋ॥ "

meaning, “he tried to wean them away from blue. He made them tie red on their heads” The Khalsa would not give up blue and could not wear red, so a split occurred.
Thus you can see that the Khalsa did indeed wear blue clothing and considered it their “special” colour, not just one colour amongst many others.
I have not written this to be a comprehensive article in support of blue. That would require a lot more research and that is something I don’t have much time for at the moment, but I did want to give an answer to the article on blue clothing.

 



Re: Blue - The Colour Of Khalsa Faujan
Posted by: Jarnail Singh "Arshi" Gyani (IP Logged)
Date: September 19, 2009 09:11PM

It is also a fact that prior to the 1950's MOST Gurdwars in Malaysia/Singapore/Thailand/Indonesia had BLUE Nishan Sahibs with Black Khanda. Kesri Nishan Sahibs were almost never seen anywhere.

1.After the Akali Dal and the Jan Sangh became "wedded" couple..and the Akali dal Badal became MRS. BJP....the Kesri Colour began to come more and more prominent...and this trend also began to catch on in this region..NOW one cannot Find even a SINGLE BLUE Nishan Sahib anywhere - not even inside the Gurdwaras. ON my travels to Punjab too, I found Blue Nishan Sahibs as common as bird's milk..only Nihung Gurdwaras had these...so it seems that only the Gurus laadlian faujaan..the Nihungs keep to Blue..

2. Guru Klagidhar's horse was also called NEELA...one of Guru jis "titles" ( for want of a better word ) is Neelehh da Shah Swaar..Neeleh ghorrian waalha Sacha Patshah.

3. Many paintings of the 1699 Vasakhi show Guru ji and the Panj in Blue.

jrnYl isMG igAwnI "ArSI"





 



Re: Blue - The Colour Of Khalsa Faujan
Posted by: Jaskirat Singh (IP Logged)
Date: November 13, 2009 12:31PM

Khalsa jee, I would just like to ask if the shade of the blue is important? Above it is written that rehatnama says “surmaiee” dark blue is the one that should be worn but as you will no doubt be aware most Nihang Singhs wear a Royal Blue colour as shown here: [farm4.static.flickr.com] and here [farm4.static.flickr.com] is there any reason behind this? I have noticed that most Gursikhs in the west wear Navy Blue though. Apologies if this sounds trivial, replies would be appreciated

 



Re: Blue - The Colour Of Khalsa Faujan
Posted by: Ekta Singh (IP Logged)
Date: November 14, 2009 07:06AM

>>>>>>>>>>>
"Sri Guru Gobind Singh Ji, tenth Guru, son of Guru Tegh Bahadur Ji, in the year 1752 on Tuesday-the Vaisakhi day-gave Khande ki pahul to five Sikhs and surnamed them as Singhs. First Daya Ram Sopti, Khatri resident of Lahore stood up. Then Mohkam Chand Calico printer of Dawarka; Sahib Chand barber of Zafrabad city; Dharam Chand Jawanda Jat of Hastinapur; Himmat Chand water carrier of Jagannath stood up one after the other. All were dressed in blue and he himself also dressed the same way. Hookah, halaal, hajaamat, haraam, tikka, janeu, dhoti were prohibited. Socialisation with the descendants of Prithi Chand, followers of Dhirmal and Ram Rai, clean shaven people and Masands was prohibited. All were given Kangha, Karad, Kesgee, Karhaa, and Kacheraa. All were made Keshdhaaree. Everyone’s place of birth was told to be Patna, of residence as Anandpur. Rest, Guru’s deeds are known only to the Guru. Repeat Guru Guru, the Guru will help everywhere
>>>>>>>>>>

ARE YOU SURE THIS ACCOUNT IS RIGHT, IF YOU LOOK AT THE DATE IT SAYS 1752, I THOUGHT VAISAKHI WAS ON 1699.

 



Re: Blue - The Colour Of Khalsa Faujan
Posted by: 13khalsa (IP Logged)
Date: November 14, 2009 08:07AM

I think 1752 is the Bikrami year not the AD year

 



Re: Blue - The Colour Of Khalsa Faujan
Posted by: Akaalee (IP Logged)
Date: November 22, 2009 07:23AM

Jaskirat Singh jee, I don’t think the shade of blue has to be perfectly matched. Different shades of Dark Blue and Royal Blue do blend together. The picture of your link shows this as you can see the Jathedaar of those Singhs wearing a slightly darker blue than the others but it does not cause a distinction.

If an enemy was to view you from distance they will not notice the difference.

I think most accounts give the reference of Neela, surmaiee is not vastly stated. I think people have interpreted surmaiee differently.

It is also important to note that I feel the blue should not stand out in the night sky. It should be able to give a reasonable camouflage.

I think light blue is a shade too distinct, so I have my doubts if this is OK. Having said that I do have a light blue Chola but I rarely wear it.

 



Re: Blue - The Colour Of Khalsa Faujan
Posted by: Jaskirat Singh (IP Logged)
Date: November 22, 2009 01:21PM

Bahut dhanvaad Akaalee jee :)

 



Re: Blue - The Colour Of Khalsa Faujan
Posted by: Akaalee (IP Logged)
Date: December 01, 2009 04:50AM

Below is a passage from Twarikh Sikhan written in Farsi by Munshi Khushwaqt Rai in 1811. He is a non Sikh so he sees things in a different light, some things written in his book do not comply with Gurmat nor are some of his comments very respectful. However it is very interesting to read what he has observed, heard and may have read.


The following is related to the formation of the Khalsa and Guru Gobind Singh Jee’s transformation :

“ਅਜ਼ਾਂ ਰੋਜ਼ ਜ਼ੁਨਾਰ ਬ ਸ਼ਿਕਸਤ, ਵ ਲਿਬਾਸ ਨੀਲਗੂੰ ਅਖ਼ਤਯਾਰ ਕਰਦ, ਵ ਜ਼ੈਵਰ ਆਹਨੀ ਗੁਜੀਦ, ਵ ਵਜਾੱ ਗ਼ੈਰ ਮੁਕੱਰਰ ਨਮੂਦ, ਨ ਦੋ ਸ਼ਮਸ਼ੈਰ ਬਰ ਕਮਰ ਬਸਤ, ਖ ਕਾਰਦ ਵ ਚੱਕ੍ਰ ਵ ਤਪੰਚਾ ਵ ਕਮਾਣ ਵਗੈਰਾ ਹਰਬਾ ਹਾਇ ਆਹਨੀ ਬਰਖ਼ੁਦ ਆਵੇਖ਼ਤ I ਵ ਦਸਤਾਰ ਬ-ਕਦਰ ਯਕ ਦਸਤ ਦਰਾਜ਼ ਬਸਤਨ ਆੱਦਤ ਕਰਦ I”

“From that day the Janeoo was broken. The Blue dress was adorned. Sarbloh ornaments were adorned. A distinct appearance was made. Two gallant Gatra were put on. Karad(Kirpan), Chakar, a Pistol, kaman and other Sarbloh weapons and ornaments were adorned. The wearing of an Ucha Dumalla was introduced.”



I don’t claim to know Farsi so the above is just a generalisation of what has been written, it is not a word for word translation.

 



Re: Blue - The Colour Of Khalsa Faujan
Posted by: Akaalee (IP Logged)
Date: December 15, 2009 06:17AM

The following is from the 'Sketch of the Sikhs' written by Lieutenant Colonel Malcolm published in 1812 :


The disciples of Govind were required to devote themselves to arms always to have steel(sarbloh) about them in some shape or other to wear a blue dress to allow their hair to grow to exclaim when they met each other Wa! Guruji Ka Khalsah! Wa Guruji Ki Futteh! which means Success to the state of the Guru! Victory attend the Guru. The intention of some of these institutions is obvious such as that principle of devotion to steel(sarbloh) by which all were made soldiers and that exclamation which made the success of their priest and that of the commonwealth the object of their hourly prayer It became in fact the watchword which was continually to revive in the minds of the Sikh disciple the obligations he owed to that community (pg48)



The mode is as follows. The convert told that he must allow his hair to grow. He must clothe himself from head to foot in blue clothes. He is then presented the five weapons a sword, a firelock, bow and arrow and a pike. One who initiate him then says The Guru is thy holy teacher and thou art his Sikh or disciple. Some sugar and water is put into a cup and stirred round with a steel(sarbloh) knife or dagger and some of the first chapters of the Adi Granth and the first chapters of the Dasama Padshah ka Granth are read and those who perform the initiation exclaim Wa! Guruji ka Khalsa! Wa! Guruji Ki Fateh!(Success to the state of the Guru! Victory attend the Guru)
(pg182-183)

 



Re: Blue - The Colour Of Khalsa Faujan
Posted by: ਖਾਲਸਾ (IP Logged)
Date: December 17, 2009 02:56PM

Below is a passage from Gurbilas Patshai 10 written by Koer Singh in 1751. I have not seen historians quote this so it will be new to most readers. Its describes Guru Sahib wearing a Blue Chola :


ਜੂਝਤ ਭਯੋ ਡਰ ਡਾਰ ਤਬੈ, ਜਬ ਯਾ ਬਿਧਿ ਸਾਹਿਬ ਨੈਨ ਨਿਹਾਰੇ I

ਨੀਲਨਿ ਚੋਲ ਬਿਰਾਜਤ ਹੈ, ਅਰੁ ਬਾਜ ਸੁਹੇਲ ਜਿਗਾ ਕਲ ਧਾਰੇ I

ਨੀਲ ਜਿਗਾ ਮਨਿ ਨੀਲ ਲਸੈ ਪਟ, ਨੀਲ ਮਨੀ ਮਨ ਭੂਖਨ ਭਾਰੇ I

 



Re: Blue - The Colour Of Khalsa Faujan
Posted by: ਖਾਲਸਾ (IP Logged)
Date: June 01, 2010 06:23AM

Below is a quote from Singh Sagar Granth written by Vir Singh Bal in 1827 mentioning the Blue Bana of the Khalsa :


ਆਲਸੁ ਨਾ ਜਾਂਨੈ ਕਹਿਯੋ ਔਰ ਕਾਨਿ ਮਾਂਨੈ ਐਸੋ I

ਖਾਲਸਾ ਮਹਾਂਨੈ ਰਚਿਯੋ ਸਾਹਿਬ ਅਪਾਰ ਜੂ I

ਨੀਲ ਪਟ ਧਾਰ ਸਭ ਆਯੁਸ ਸੰਭਾਰ ਸਿੰਘ,

ਉਠੈ ਭਬਕਾਰ ਕਾਂਪੈ ਕਾਬਲੁ ਘੰਧਾਰ ਜੂ I

 



Re: Blue - The Colour Of Khalsa Faujan
Posted by: admin (IP Logged)
Date: June 02, 2010 08:42AM

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